Serotonin Toxicity Syndrome in Pregnancy: Could the Values of Blood Gases be Affected?

Authors

  • Stavros Gourgiotis Second Surgical Department, 401 General Army Hospital of Athens. Athens, Greece
  • Paraskevi Aravosita Intensive Care Unit, ‘Mitera’ Obstetric & Gynecologic Hospital, Athens
  • Christina Mystakelli Intensive Care Unit, ‘Mitera’ Obstetric & Gynecologic Hospital, Athens
  • Stavros Aloizos Intensive Care Unit, ‘Mitera’ Obstetric & Gynecologic Hospital, Athens

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.2015/hc.v8i1.468

Keywords:

pregnancy, serotonin, serotonin toxicity syndrome, blood gases

Abstract

Serotonin toxicity syndrome is a potentially life-threatening condition caused by excessive serotonergic activity in the nervous system. It is characterized by mental status changes, autonomic instability, and neuromuscular hyperactivity. Critically ill patients may require neuromuscular paralysis, sedation, and intubation. If serotonin syndrome is recognized and complications are managed appropriately, the prognosis is favorable.

In the presented case clinical presentation and outcome of the serotonin syndrome which was developed in a 30-year-old pregnant woman with a medical history of depression managed by selective serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors is discussed. This case is presented to inform physicians about our observations regarding the results of blood gases and to discuss our possible explanation.

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Published

2013-01-01

Issue

Section

CASE REPORTS